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UK Students Travel to Shanghai for Intensive Program

With the school year freshly completed, 11 students in the College of Arts and Sciences are kicking off the summer in a unique way— with a 4-week intensive language and culture program in Shanghai, China.

Immigration Research on Display: Wired Students at the Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars

At the end of each academic year, the Society for the Promotion of Undergraduate Research hosts the Showcase of Undergraduate ScholarsCristina Alcalde, one of three faculty co-directors at A&S Wired and a professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, mentored three Wired students during the past academic year. 

All three students conducted focus-group research. Elizabeth Kunnecke studied differences between perceptions of first and second generation immigrants. Tyler Davoren looked at geographic influences on perceptions of immigrants. Emily VanMeter examined how people’s religious attitudes influenced the way they interacted with immigrants. Their posters were on display on April 25, 2012, in the Ballroom at the Student Center. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Lecture to Discuss Arab World Revolutions

The revolutions throughout Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and other nations in the Arab world have inspired earnest debate among experts. UK experts will discuss related topics this Friday.

Robert Wagoner

Robert Wagoner was an undergraduate and graduate student in Classics at the University of Kentucky. He earned a BA in Classics and Philosophy in 2002, and an MA in Classics and a Graduate Certificate in Latin Studies in 2004. As a graduate student at UK, Robert pursued both Greek and Latin studies.

Classics Awarded Graduate School Academic Year Fellowship

By: Jonathon Spalding

For two millennia the leading intellects of Western Europe expressed their most sophisticated thoughts in a language that is now largely considered extinct.

Reed DeMarco

Reed DeMarco was born outside of Detroit, MI and earned his B.A. in Classics from Wayne State University in Detroit in 2007. He was then awarded a teaching assistantship for his graduate studies at the University of Kentucky, finishing his degree in 2009. After Kentucky, Reed moved back to Michigan to pursue a teaching certification at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids.

Erika Peck Bucciantini

When my students ask me why I became a Latin teacher, I often tell them it was fate. This, obviously, is the short answer I give during class time when they have asked an off-topic question to avoid conjugating deponent verbs or learning about gerunds and gerundives. The truth of the matter is that I have grown to love the Latin language and couldn’t imagine my life without it.

RJ Parson

RJ “Publius” Parsons came to the University of Kentucky after several years in which he taught high-school music and Latin in Miami, Florida, and Glendale, California. He has done extensive research into impressionistic music theory, medieval polyphony, and renaissance counterpoint most recently creating a musical score of sacred motets written by the sixteenth-century Flemish composer Noe Faignant.

Jonathan Meyer

Jonathan Meyer studied classics and religion at Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI) and Yale Divinity School before coming to the University of Kentucky. He has also participated in the summer Latin program directed by Reginald Foster (OCD). He has taught students in Latin and Greek at the high school and college levels and has assisted in graduate courses dealing with biblical studies, religious history, and ancient Greek history.

William Little

Hailing from Carmel, CA, William Little completed his undergraduate studies at Harvard University in 2010 and subsequently earned a Master’s Degree in Medieval Studies at Fordham University, where he wrote a thesis exploring the practice and use of Biblical exegesis at the eleventh-century court of Matilda, Countess of Tuscany. His interests lie in the intellectual and literary history of the Latin Middle Ages, in particular Biblical exegesis and the reception of classical texts (especially poetry).

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