IS Capstone Project & Seminar


INT 495 Capstone Seminar for International Studies Majors (3 credit hours)


INT 495 is designed to provide a “capstone” or conclusion to the International Studies Major. Its objective is to provide an opportunity to conduct research on an international or global theme and so that the student integrates the linkages between the themes, areas, and disciplinary foci of study.

IS Majors who are Seniors enroll in a section of INT 495 and work directly with the course instructor. Each instructor has chosen a broad topic. Each individual paper will be related somehow to that broad topic.

NOTE: INT 495 IS ONLY OFFERED IN THE FALL AND SPRING SEMESTER.

INT 495 is not to be taken while studying abroad. Students planning on studying abroad in the Spring and graduating in either May or August, will need to take INT 495 in the Fall.
 

Fall 2016

INT 495-001:  "Global Crime & Justice"
Instructor:  Prof. Janet P. Stamatel
T, R  11:00am-12:15pm
Location: Patterson Office Tower, room 1506

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to describe and explain geographic and historical variations in the amounts and types of crime across countries and to understand contemporary transnational crime problems.  Students will critically examine the data, methods, and theories used to measure and explain crime across nations and over time.  They will learn how to make informed comparisons across a broad range of countries and world regions.  Additionally, students will be introduced to the complexities of studying large-scale international and transnational crimes, like human trafficking and genocide.

 

INT 495-002:  "Collective Identities Local and Global"
Instructor:  Prof. Diane E. King
T  2:00-4:30pm
Location:  Taylor Education Building,  Room 122

The theme of this section of INT 495 is “Collective Identities Local and Global.” Collective identity categories are found throughout the world. People create and dissolve groups, and assign meaning to collectively-recognized symbols and practices. Some groups may be powerful and dominant, and others weak and dominated. Collective identity is historically and culturally situated and shifting. In this course, we will explore collective identities in both specific and local senses as well as globally. We will cover some of the ways in which people interpret ancestral and genetic history, and consider cases of “native” and colonized identities. We will consider a proposal to move beyond "blood" identities. Students will carry out a substantial research project on collective identity with an international emphasis.

 

INT 495-003:  "Global Racism"
Instructor:  Prof. Carlos de la Torre
W  4:00-6:30pm
Location:  Patterson Office Tower, Room 110

In this section students will learn different theoretical and methodological perspectives to study racism in a global and interdisciplinary perspective. We will draw on the work of academics working in different disciplines such as Sociology, Anthropology, Discourse Analysis, and Political Science. In the class we will read studies about the US, Europe, and Latin America. Drawing on the bibliography used in class and on supplementary readings students will write a series of short papers that will help them to develop their final project. They will write: 1) a description and a justification of their research question, explaining what methods they will apply in their research project. 2) A five pages paper reviewing the literature. 3) A detailed outline of their paper. 4) They will write a first draft of about 12 pages. 5) A second draft of their capstone project of 25 pages. 6) A final revised version of the research paper.

 

Spring 2016


INT 495-001:  "Justifications for War, Peace, and Nationalism"
Instructor:  Dr. Mark Whitaker
W  3:00-5:30pm
Location:  Patterson Office Tower, Room 112

This capstone course will address the justifications humans use for war, nationalism and peace – but most particularly the justifications often given for the ‘necessity’ of war between and within states. During European colonization and until the end of the 20th century international conflicts were generally justified using a European discourse called ‘just war’ theory (or its mirror opposite: ‘realism’), and fragments of this talk can still be found in many more recent conversations about conflict. Yet nonwestern practices and understandings of conflict, peace and community increasingly challenge even these fragments, and insist upon alternative forms of justification and commitment. Using theoretical perspectives drawn from a fairly wide variety of disciplines, but united under the instructor’s disciplinary focus on Anthropology, this course will use these controversies about war, peace and nationalism as the topical focus of our discussions.

INT 495-002:  "International Economic Issues"
Instructor:  Dr. Michael E. Samers
T, R  2:00-3:15pm
Location:  Patterson Office Tower, Room 110

This senior capstone course is designed to explore major international economic issues in the second decade of the 21st century. Through lectures and discussions, it investigates a number of different themes, including (but not limited to) the renewed question of US economic dominance but overall  stagnant growth in the advanced economies; the environmental consequences of global production networks, points of conflict in international trade focusing on tensions between the Chinese and US governments over the trade in manufactured products and services, changing sites of global production (e.g. the rise of African countries as a site for manufacturing), global finance and its implications for currency values, the debate over whether robotics is increasing unemployment, and tensions in energy markets, including the rise of shale gas. Using a theoretical and conceptual approach that draws on thinking from a range of economically relevant disciplines (for example, economics, economic geography, economic sociology, and international political economy), the purpose is to construct a coherent but flexible vocabulary in order to competently analyze major international economic issues.

INT 495-003:  "Global Migrations"
Instructor: Dr. Francis Musoni
R  4:00-6:30pm
Location:  Patterson Office Tower, Room 112

The objective of this seminar is to introduce students to the study of migration from a global perspective and help them write capstone projects on migration-related topics. We will examine debates surrounding the causes of migration, different forms of migration as well as migrants’ experiences in host countries and societies. Selected readings and other course materials will cover themes such as forced migration, labor migration, illegal migration, xenophobia, sex trafficking, refugee resettlement and integration as well as migrants’ access to health in North America, Europe, Africa and Asia. Students’ projects can focus on any part of the world as long as they deal with migration-related topics.
 

Fall 2015


INT 495-001 "Environmental Dimensions of Globalization"
Instructor: Dr. Karen Rignall
M 4:00-6:30 PM
Location:  F. Paul Anderson Tower, room 267

This capstone seminar will explore different social science perspectives on the environmental dimensions of globalization. What is the relationship between ecological dynamics and globalization as a set of economic, social, and political processes -- from the molecular level to the global climate? Through readings from a variety of disciplines and in-depth writing, we will challenge our assumptions about what is global and local, natural and social, economic and ecological, among other concepts. We will examine some of the most pressing issues of our day, such as climate change and deforestation that we commonly understand as "environmental" and think critically about how they relate to globalization. We will also address issues we may not always think of as environmental, such as labor migration, global financial markets, and the production of your smartphone to explore how globalization and environmental dynamics influence each other.

INT 495-002 "Global Protests"
Instructor: Dr. Carlos de la Torre
T 4:00-6:30 PM
Location:  Multi-Disciplinary Science Bldg, 206

In this section students will learn different theoretical and methodological perspectives to study protest and collective action in a global and interdisciplinary perspective. We will draw on the work of academics working in different disciplines such as Sociology, History, Anthropology, and Political Science. In the class we will read studies about the Middle East, Europe, the US, and Latin America.

INT 495-003 "Global Decolonization under the Age of the American Empire"
Instructor: Dr. Lien-Hang T. Nguyen
W 3:00-5:30 PM
Location:  Central Residence Hall #2, Room 005

The international Cold War in the post-1945 era witnessed two global developments: the decolonization of vast territories in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East as well as the solidification of the American Empire  - both in the wake of the European powers' demise.  As the United States competed and defeated the Soviet Union to cement its unparalleled position on the world stage, wars for national liberation, revolutions, and the emergence of new postcolonial states arose in much of the non-Western world.  The expansion of the American empire and the global processes of decolonization overlapped and intersected, and their ramifications continue to persist into the post-Cold War era and the 21st century.  Utilizing primary source documentation from the United States as well as translated materials from archives across the world, and examining the field of international Cold War studies through secondary literature, students will produce history research papers relating these two developments.
 

Spring 2015


INT 495-001 "Global Migration
Instructor: Francis Musoni
T, R  9:30 am - 10:45 am
Location:  Patterson Office Tower, room 1745

INT 495-002 "Contemporary Literary and Visual Arts of Japan"
Instructor:  Douglas Slaymaker
T, R  12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Location:  Taylor Education Bldg, room 231

INT 495-003 "Analyzing Neoliberalism"
Instructor: Susan Roberts
T, R  11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Location:  Roselle Residence Hall, Room 0130

INT 495-004  "War, Peace, and Nationalism"
.Instructor:  Mark P. Whitaker
T, R 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Location:  Funkhouser Biological Sciences Bldg., room B3
 

Spring 2014


INT 495-001 "International Migration"
Instructor: Francis Musoni

The primary objective of INT 495 International Studies Seminar on International Migration is to provide an opportunity for students to conduct independent research and write an essay (about 25 pages in length), on topics related to cross-border movements in any part of the world. Students in this seminar may choose to work on topics such as: forced migration and refugees; labor migration; xenophobia; sex trafficking; smuggling; border jumping; border enforcement; informal cross-border trade; border conflicts; etc.

INT 495-002 "Considering War, Peace, Nationalism and their Justifications"
Instructor: Mark Whitaker
Course Information Forthcoming.

INT 495-003 "Cross-National Crime"
Instructor: Janet Stamatel

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to describe and explain geographic and historical variations in the amounts and types of crime across countries and to understand contemporary transnational crime problems. Students will critically examine the data, methods, and theories used to measure and explain crime across nations and over time. They will learn how to make informed comparisons across a broad range of countries and world regions. Additionally, students will be introduced to the complexities of studying large-scale international and transnational crimes, like human trafficking and genocide.
 

Fall 2013


INT 495-001 "The International History of the Cold War"
Instructor: Lien Hang T. Nguyen
Wednesday 3:30-6:00pm

INT 495-002 "Analyzing Neoliberalism and Post-Neoliberalism"
Instructor:  Susan Roberts
TR 9:30-10:45am

INT 495-401 "Global Racism"
Instructor: Carlos de la Torre
MW 5-6:15 pm

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